By Amit Walia, EVP Managing Partner at Compodium

With National Work Life Week taking place in the UK between 12th-16th October, it’s a time for everybody to focus on wellbeing and work life balance.

Mental Health UK (with the help of YouGov) have found that 51% of people feel they’re more prone to extreme stress levels this year compared with last year.

Finding harmony between the different aspects of life is central to our happiness and wellbeing.

Sadly we’re still living with uncertainty, so prioritising wellbeing is more important than ever to avoid burnout, a state of exhaustion that the WHO recognised as an ‘occupational phenomenon’ in 2019.
 

Remote working

The Covid-19 pandemic has led to many people working remotely and relying on video communication platforms to keep in touch with their colleagues.

Openness and honesty about the challenges and joys this brings are essential. It’s important to recognise that people are often balancing work with parenting or caring commitments.

Home-working has become a familiar and relatable situation, often injecting humour into our days, with pets and children making guest appearances or a knock at the door mid-meeting.

In many ways, our working lives have become more informal and personable, which I think is a positive change as it’s helping to break down barriers.

Video communication

With social distancing requirements likely to be with us for the foreseeable future, it’s important that we continue using video communication technology to make our lives easier.

Video calls give people the ability to check in with their colleagues as well as engaging more formally for meetings. Keeping in touch is helpful for wellbeing as it’s a time to reflect on how things are going, resolve any issues or just to talk.

We’re all navigating our way through challenging times, and people are sharing innovative and resourceful ways to help us make the most of this unprecedented era.

Finding the balance

Many health and fitness practitioners are using video communication technology to continue their teaching, with classes on everything from yoga to karate happening in living rooms far and wide.

Online workouts with Joe Wicks became a daily routine for many during the national lockdown, seeing him awarded with a Guinness World Record and an MBE.

Work colleagues are also using virtual meetings to keep in touch socially with one another, engaging in virtual quizzes and after work drinks. And organisations are providing online wellbeing talks and activities to help people with their mental health during the pandemic.

Whilst the new normal is still as much a goal as a reality, video communication is making the difference to people’s lives, helping us to find the balance between all the aspects of our lives.

It’s exciting to consider how this will evolve over the coming months and years as people find ever more innovative ways of harnessing the opportunities it brings.